Build Tip How to Terraform and Colour using Advanced Worldedit

Did you read the whole tutorial?


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Lycqn

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Mar 30, 2015
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lolyouwish
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#1
Welcome to my thread about using Advanced Worldedit to terraform and color :) Most "advanced" commands or 'parameters' are mainly based about coloring as it is a vital element in terrain. This tutorial is 10% terraforming and 90% coloring, sorry! The only commands we will be using is //brush //replace //copy //paste and //gmask (//pos1 and //pos2 are also used but that's for positions so it's not included)

Now let's begin!

T E R R A F O R M I N G
Shaping the terrain takes time and practice (of course there are commands that auto-generates terrain for you but let's not get too into detail about that)

SHAPING
Using //brush sphere <block> 4 to create the shape of the terrain
- Use a visible color block such as colored wool or ore blocks
- Create a sloped wall using //brush sphere command and keep going up and outwards, making sure to create small flatter ledges for realistic measures
- Each color are 'layers' which is (honestly) spammed spheres (disregard the colors in the picture, it is just to show how to add to the slope)






FINAL UNSMOOTHED AND UNEDITED TERRAIN
- This is what it should considerably look like after shaping the terrain


FINAL SMOOTHED AND EDITED TERRAIN
- Now to smooth the terrain, use //brush smooth or be a pro and handsmooth it
- To edit the terrain, smooth any rough edges and add onto the terrain wherever you think is flat/plain using //brush sphere


C O L O R I NG
Coloring the terrain takes time, a lot of practice and a good sense of palettes, colors and composition skills (the terrain can either look 10 times better or 10 times worse after coloring)

FRACTURE COLORING
- To highlight the indents and ridges in the terrain you can add so-called 'fractures' to terrain, this will give your terrain a nice, small and effortless detail
- Select your terrain using //pos1 and //pos2 (or however you select builds) and type
//replace ^[45d][90d][5] block
- You can of course change the numbers but I don't recommend it
- Replace 'block' in the command to any desired block, preferably a block that will show contrast to the base block


BASE COLORING

- Base coloring is just coloring the terrain with basic and clear contrasting blocks such as the bright colors of wool or ore blocks
Now this is where it gets a bit tricky...
- Select your terrain again (won't need to if you reselect it if you just did the previous command)
- To only affect the base block and exclude the fractures, use //gmask block, for example: if your base block is diamond and your fracture block is redstone, type //gmask diamond so it will only affect that certain block
- After setting your //gmask block, type //replace /[0d][-d] block
- The '0' is a zero, do not replace the 0 with anything, replace '-' to any number ranging from 0-90
- This command will give you a layer like and detailed base color of the terrain

!!! VERY IMPORTANT: ALWAYS DESCEND, NEVER ASCEND !!!
Example:
- //replace /[0d][70d] block1
- //replace /[0d][55d] block2
- //replace /[0d][35d] block3



^ Here I did //gmask diamond //replace /[0d][70d] 22 (lapis)

Now repeat the step, gmask the most recent block and replace with another color



^ Here I did //gmask 22 //replace /[0d][40d] 41 (gold)

CHOOSING PALETTES
- Now this can either be the most hated part or the most fun (if you like colors and blocks then this is the hobby for you)
- Choose palettes that fit the terrain accordingly, example: top layer = grass, middle layer = light rock, bottom layer = dark rock
- The more layers you have, the more palettes you need to come up with, suggested amount of layers is 3-4, any terrain with 5 layers or more will make your terrain look messy
- Make sure to include a lot of variation and texture in your palettes!


These are the three palettes I chose, the left palette is for grass, the middle palette is for light rock and the right palette is for dark rock


^ Not all blocks were used in the final terrain, these are just 'ideas' that could have been added

REPLACING BASE COLORS WITH PALETTES
- This is where you add the palettes to the base layers
- Type //gmask to disable the //gmask from the previous command
- Select the terrain if you haven't done so already
- Use //replace block #simplex[#][blocks] for this part
- Replace the first 'block' with the base color, replace '#' with a number ranging from 5-25 (size of 'blobs') and replace 'blocks' with the blocks of the palette, the smaller the terrain the smaller the number should be, the larger terrain = the larger number
- After replacing the blocks you can always switch them with other blocks if you don't like how it looks like

Here is the order of commands that I used for my terrain:

- //replace gold #simplex[20][grass,35:13,248,252:13]
- //replace 22 #simplex[20][mossy,16,43:8,1:4,1:6,98]
- //replace diamond #simplex[20][35:7,251:7,242:7,7]

Final look of the colored terrain


Now, you're probably wondering about the fracture (it hasn't been replaced with a block yet oh no oo)
- Replace the block with any block you deem fit, it could be a dark color to compliment the dark rock, or it can be a light color to contrast the terrain and give it more highlight
OR you can create a waterfall or lava if you wish!
- This is a simple //replace block block
- Replace first block with block of the fracture and replace the second block with anything you want

Here's a few examples:


Waterfall


Waterfall using glass


White highlight using quartz


Dark highlight using dark prismarine

ADDING GRASS AND FLOWERS
- To compliment the terrain, nature should be added such as grass and flowers
- Select the terrain if you haven't done that already
- To add grass or flowers do //gmask air //replace >grassblocks 31:1,flower,air
- Replace 'grassblocks' with all of your blocks you used for your grass layer, replace flower with any flower want, always add 'air' so it won't cover all the grass

Example: //gmask air //replace >grass,35:13,248,252:13 31:1,38:1,air


^ Here I used the command above, I did not use flowers

ADDING BUSHES
- Another option are bushes, they make the terrain more texturised and realistic
- Here you use the command: //gmask air //replace >grassblocks #simplex[5][18,air],air
- Always use this command for bushes




ADDING TREES
- To finish things off, add trees to spice it up (or should I say.. spruce it up)
- Make a tree (this isn't a tree tutorial so I won't be showing you how to make a tree)
- Select the tree, //copy it and use //paste -a to paste it around the terrain
- Remember to add the '-a' after 'paste' to avoid ruining the terrain
- Remember to place them randomly and leave a few spaces so the terrain isn't fully covered!


Example of adding tall trees:



Example of adding short trees:



...and there you have it! A complete finished detailed terrain that your plot neighbors will get jealous of and a good piece of terrain to show off

If you have any questions, comment, ask me in game or send a message on discord, my name is Lycqn#6413

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IGN: Lycqn